Niagara Gazette

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September 25, 2013

Schools need to teach students to maintain attention

(Continued)

SWARTHMORE, Pa. — (Optional add end)

Developing the "sustained attention muscle" should be a central part of education. Is there any evidence that it is? I fear not, and I think that recent trends are not encouraging. In universities, value is placed on being a popular teacher who commands large enrollments. One doesn't do that by demanding sustained engagement with difficult material. And MOOCs, whatever their potential cost-saving benefits, enable students to watch presentations in brief snatches, perfect for the attentionally challenged, which in turn pressures instructors to organize their material in matching, bite-sized portions. We all let students bring their laptops into class, which virtually guarantees that they will be shuttling between email and web surfing while occasionally taking notes on what is being said. None of this is a recipe for strengthening the sustained attention muscle.

Perhaps I'm crying wolf. Perhaps there are things going on in popular culture to suggest a countervailing appreciation of experiences that demand sustained attention. There are a few somewhat hopeful developments. The longform journalism that used to appear in the pages of The New Yorker and a handful of other magazines is now reappearing online. And there is great enthusiasm for long-form television, as evidenced by shows like "The Wire," "Homeland" and "Breaking Bad." But I'm not sure that the TV shows do the job, despite the complexity of their narratives and the subtlety of their characters. What we don't know about TV is how people actually watch these shows. First, the shows are produced in bite-sized installments. And second, viewers can always hit pause to check incoming texts and emails or grab a snack. Indeed, there was a revealing study by Leif Nelson and some colleagues a few years ago that showed that even though viewers said that commercials detracted from their enjoyment of TV shows, in actual fact, the interruptions led to higher ratings of the shows than when viewers watched them uninterrupted. Nelson's explanation of this result did not appeal to issues of sustained attention, but it seems possible that the attention breaks that commercials bring play a role in making the shows more fun to watch.

The world is complex, and it isn't going to get any simpler. Unless we can create a population that is capable of thinking about complexity in complex ways, it is highly unlikely that the problems of global warming; economic inequality; access to affordable, high-quality health care; or any of the other challenges the U.S. and the rest of the world face will get adequate solutions. Good solutions to any of these problems will be complex, and they will not win support from a population that demands simplicity. Teachers have a responsibility to train complex minds that are suited to a complex world. This is at least as important as teaching young people mathematics, biology, or literature. For teachers, at all levels, attention must be paid to teaching that attention must be paid.

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