Niagara Gazette

September 29, 2013

FIRE CALLS: Niagara Falls fire reports published Sept. 28

Staff Reports
Niagara Gazette

For the period of Sept. 9 to 22 the Niagara Falls Fire Department responded to 225 calls. The total number of service calls for 2013 to date is 4,793.

• ACCIDENT: On Sept. 9, a two-vehicle accident at 11:46 a.m. at the intersection of Pine Avenue and Packard Road sent Engine 8 and Truck 1 to the scene. The drivers of both vehicles were stabilized by the arriving crews and taken to local hospitals for further evaluation of their injuries.

• FIRE: On Sept. 12, Platoon 2 was dispatched, at 5:04 a.m. to a structure fire in the 400 block of Fifth Street. The first floor of the vacant house was fully involved in flames when firefighters arrived. The fire then spread up a pipe chase to the second and third floors. Damage was estimated at $15,000. The cause of the blaze remains under investigation.

• INCIDENT: On Sept. 13, Engine 4 and Truck 1 responded at 1:12 p.m. to the 1700 block of Ferry Avenue for a call of people possibly suffering symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. National Fuel was called to the scene and shut off the gas to the furnace. As a reminder, you should have your heating system and chimney checked by a professional every year. These calls become more frequent as residents are turning on their furnaces for the first time as the weather begins to get colder. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include feeling very tired, having long-lasting headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Carbon monoxide detectors are life-savers and should be installed in your home on all living area floors, particularly near bedrooms and sleeping areas.

• FIRE: On Sept. 18, Platoon 3 was called, at 3:28 p.m. to the 2300 block of 15th Street for a house fire. Heavy fire conditions were present when crews arrived. Damage was estimated at $20,000. The cause of the fire was determined to be a short in the wiring to a window air conditioner. Two dogs and a cat perished in the fire, but another dog was saved. One firefighter was injured fighting the blaze and taken to a local hospital for treatment.

• NOTE: Kids have fire drills at school and adults have them at work. Why shouldn’t you have them at home? Fires are frightening and can cause panic. By rehearsing different scenarios, your family will be less likely to waste precious time trying to figure out what to do. Planned escape routes are a necessity. Always plan two from each room, in case one is blocked by fire. Make sure that the windows in every room are easy to open and are not painted over or nailed shut. They might be your only way out of a fire.