Niagara Gazette

Police Reports

January 19, 2013

FIRE CALLS: Niagara Falls fire reports published Jan. 19

For the period of Jan. 7 to 13, the Niagara Falls Fire Department responded to 117 calls. The total number of service calls to date is 219.

• ACCIDENT: On Jan. 10, Engine 4 and Truck 1 responded, at 8:53 a.m., to the 1300 block of Whitney Avenue for a report of people injured in a car accident. The crews stabilized two patients who were subsequently transported to a local hospital for further treatment.

 
• ACCIDENT: On Jan. 11, Engine 7 and Truck 2 were dispatched, at 8:51 p.m., to the intersection of 72nd Street and Niagara Falls Boulevard for another vehicle accident. Two people were evaluated and treated on the scene before they were taken by ambulance to area hospitals.

 
• FIRE: On Jan. 12, a full assignment from Platoon 3 was sent, at 6:14 a.m., to the 2300 block of 16th Street for a structure fire. Careless smoking was the cause of the blaze that resulted in $2,500 damage to the second floor of the building.

 
• FIRST AID: On Jan. 12, Engine 4’s crew, consisting of Captain Gordon Stewart and Firefighters Jason Cafarella, Tom Tedesco and Michael Dorsey, went to the 1100 block of Ferry Avenue at 8:52 p.m. to assist a person having an asthma attack. They administered two doses of Albuterol and oxygen to the patient to immediately alleviate her symptoms and she was later taken to Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center for additional care.

 
• FIRE: On Jan. 12, firefighters from Platoon 3 responded, at 9:27 p.m., to a report of fire blowing out the second floor windows of a house in the 400 block of 10th Street. An electrical malfunction in an outlet was the cause of the fire was that was quickly put out. Damage was set at $15,000 to the building and its contents. Two adults and four children were provided with temporary living arrangements by the Red Cross.

 
• NOTE: It’s a fact. Having a smoke alarm in the house cuts your risk of dying in a fire in half. Almost 60 percent of all fatal residential fires occur in homes that don’t have smoke alarms. This may be the single most important thing you can do to keep your family safe from fires. If your home doesn’t have smoke alarms, now is the time to install them on every level of your home and in each bedroom. If possible, choose one with a 10-year lithium battery. If your smoke alarm uses a regular battery, remember to replace it at least once a year. Test your smoke alarms monthly and be sure your children are familiar with the sound of the alarm. Because smoke rises, smoke detectors should always be placed on ceilings or high on walls. If a smoke detector near the kitchen goes off while you’re cooking, do not take the battery out of it, you may forget to replace it. Open the doors and windows instead.
 

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