Niagara Gazette

Opinion

January 1, 2013

BRADBERRY: Should old acquaintance be forgot, or not?

(Continued)

Niagara Gazette — • Cabbage leaves, being representative of paper currency are considered a sign of prosperity

• In some regions, rice is a lucky food that should be eaten on New Year's Day

Other historic New Year’s traditions include Emancipation Day for some African Americans, New Year’s Day is sometimes called Jubilee Day. On Jan. 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing some slaves from bondage, was read in Boston. The uniquely African-American celebration, Kwanzaa, continues over seven days starting Dec. 26, so the New Year’s celebration is often part of Kwanzaa’s way of reconnecting people with their African roots. Kwanzaa began in the United States in the 1960s, and is not celebrated in Africa.

Today, though the original reasons for many of the ancient New Year’s traditions have been long forgotten, some remain, and some are being replaced by newer, bigger extravaganzas that will keep the world’s oldest, truly global international holiday hopeful, alive and well.

Contact Bill at bill.bradberry@yahoo.com

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