Niagara Gazette

Opinion

October 2, 2012

BRADBERRY: Pivot, walk-back and double-down shuffle

Niagara Gazette — There’s a brand new dance craze in town; the Presidential Pivot, Walk-Back & Double Down Shuffle debuting tonight on live television in front of  a worldwide audience as the two leading White House candidates face off in the first of three so-called debates barely one month before election day, Nov. 6.

While South Korean rapper PSY’s crazy horse-riding- like Gangnam Style fever has effectively swept the universe over the past few weeks with his pulsating beats, mesmerizing chorus and wild dance gyrations, this highly anticipated, well rehearsed, well staged production promises to debut with all of the sparkle, shine and fanfare of a Hollywood production matching the scale of some of the hugely popular song & dance talent shows that are flooding the prime-time market these days, but this one could be a game changer.

The biggest winner may be the performer who has best mastered the latest dance moves. Way beyond the Twist, the Rumba, the Cha Cha, Waltz and even the Tango; tonight we may have the honor and the privilege of witnessing an all new version of the Sidestep, now known as the Presidential Pivot, Walk-Back & Double-Down Shuffle.

Think of tonight as a sort of rap contest with the players trying their royal best to respond to some questions without actually answering them; they accomplish that by engaging slick combinations of the shuffle.

The pivot, for example, is a favorite of most politicians who use the Shuffle. When it is smoothly employed, neither the person who raised the question, nor the attentive audience is even aware of what just happened; the clever politician will appear to be answering a question while, in fact, (s)he has actually changed the subject.

The Walk-Back reminiscent of the late Michael Jackson’s Moon Walk, is nothing less than fascinating to watch when it is done properly. The walk lets a politician who has said something, usually extreme, remove some elements of an otherwise harsh statement, making it seem less offensive to the audience, but not necessarily to the intended recipient of his or her scorn.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Opinion
Featured Ads
House Ads
AP Video
Two Women Narrowly Avoid Being Hit by Train In Virginia, the Rise of a New Space Coast New Sanctions on Key Sectors of Russian Economy Crayola Announces Family Attraction in Orlando US Ready to Slap New Sanctions on Russia Kerry: Not Worried About Israeli Criticism Boater Rescued From Edge of Kentucky Dam Girl Struck by Plane on Florida Beach Dies Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre House to Vote on Slimmed-down Bill for Border Looming Demand Could Undercut Flight Safety Raw: 2 Shells Hit Fuel Tank at Gaza Power Plant Raw: Massive Explosions From Airstrikes in Gaza Giant Ketchup Bottle Water Tower Up for Sale Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Raw: Corruption Trial Begins for Former Va Gov. The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating
Opinion
House Ads
Night & Day
Twitter News
Follow us on twitter
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Front page