Niagara Gazette

July 21, 2013

GLYNN: Mob conclave drew area delegates

BY DON GLYNN
Niagara Gazette

Niagara Gazette — For decades Niagara Falls was infamous for its connections to organized crime. 

Ironically, many local residents for whatever reason didn’t seem bothered by that image. In fact, they seemed to just accept it.

It took a meeting in November 1957 in the small town of Apalachin, 15 miles west of Binghamton, to convince the rest of the world that the Mafia really existed. If it hadn’t been for State Police Sgt. Edgar Croswell, that secret meeting at the home of mobster Joseph Barbara Sr., and the list of nearly 100 mobsters in attendance would probably never have been unveiled. On routine patrol, Croswell noted the steady line of sleek cars arriving at the Barbara residence and called for backup. When all the license plates were run, a roadblock was quickly in place and the crime figures soon in custody.

The riveting story is recounted in the “Mafia Summit,” by Gil Reavill (St. Martin’s Press, 301 pages, hardcover, 2013). Reavill, an author, screenwriter and playwright, co-authored “Beyond All Reason: My Life With Susan Smith.”

Area delegates at that session included Stefano Magaddino of Lewiston, known in crime circles then as “The Undertaker,” for the funeral home he operated. (Police investigators said he had a powerful voice in deciding the summit site); Anthony “Nino” Magaddino, 60, vice president of the former Magaddino Funeral Home, Niagara Street; James V. LaDuca of Lewiston, 45, secretary-treasurer of the Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union, Buffalo, and John C. Montana, 64, owner of Van Dyke Taxi (Yellow Cab) & Transfer Co., Buffalo (The year before the mob convention, the Erie Club in the Queen City honored him as its “Man of the Year” for numerous civic contributions. 

Lest we forget, the Apalachin Summit was a kind of bust, as the author says. No blood spilled. No gunfights as the crime bosses dashed to avoid the roadblock. The federal conspiracy convictions of 20 of the participants were reversed upon appeal. Still, as Trooper Croswell said after the roundup: “I don’t know what is going to happen in the courts. But the State Police action threw the mobsters up in the air, where everybody could take a shot at them.” The author aptly noted: “The resulting exposure dosed the Mafia with its least favorite poison: publicity.”

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Works of Niagara Falls native Thomas Aquinas Daly, an award-winning contemporary landscape and still-life painter, will be featured at an exhibit, “Quiet Places” in the Kenan Center, July 28 to Sept. 8. An opening day reception is set for 2 to 5 p..m. at the gallery, 4331 Locust St., Lockport.

Daly, who attended the former Bishop Duffy High School and graduated with a degree in graphic arts at the University of Buffalo, spent 23 years in the commercial printing business before leaving that field in 1981 to devote himself full time to painting. His works have been displayed in numerous exhibitions at galleries, museums and universities across the U.S. President Gerald R. for recognized Daly’s talent by awarding him the Grand Central Art Gallery’s Gold Medal at the opening of Daly’s 1987 show in New York.

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CLOSE CALL: Retired journalist George Gates, 82, who launched his career with the Niagara Gazette in the late 1950s, nearly drowned last week after he slipped off a rock along the eastern shore of Lake George, some 60 miles north of Albany. Gates was the Gazette’s City Hall reporter in the era when work started on the $720-million Niagara Power Project and the Cataract City’s population topped 100,000. Later, he spent 37 years with the Buffalo News as a city hall reporter and editorial writer before retiring in 1998.

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PARTING SHOTS: Overheard at Ashker’s Cafe, Youngstown: “I was at his funeral. Wow! There were so many people the line went right out the door. I think some of those people just wanted to make sure ...”

That’s reminiscent of Mark Twain’s famous line: “I didn’t attend the funeral but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

Contact Reporter Don Glynn at 282-2311, ext. 2246.

Contact Reporter Don Glynn at 282-2311, ext. 2246.