Niagara Gazette

January 13, 2013

Consultant hired for Falls school project; students to now be registered at central office

by Timothy Chipp
Niagara Gazette

Niagara Gazette — A Pittsford firm is being tapped to find the maximum economic and non-economic benefits available as part of the Niagara Falls City School District's upcoming capital improvement project.

Seeler Engineering is the district administration's choice to perform the study, which will result in a project labor agreement, necessary to start work on the project, which already has state approval to replace the roof at LaSalle Preparatory School.

"This will tell us what economic benefits are available from our project and what non-economic benefits there are," Assistant Superintendent Mark Laurrie said Thursday. "We really need to move on it."

The agreement needs district School Board approval, which is expected to occur at the next meeting, scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 24.

Once the study is completed, the labor agreement should be available for the board to vote on in the early part of February, possibly at a special meeting Feb. 7.

"We're full speed ahead here," Laurrie said.

"If this is successful," the district's attorney, Angelo Massaro, added, "you'll see the actual agreement in February."

In other district news, parents will soon be asked to register new students at a centralized location beginning in February.

The City of Niagara Falls City School District will begin registering students at its Central Office location, 630 66th Street, as it streamlines its registration process.

District Administrator for Assessment Marcia Capone explains that the centralized process will provide relief to school personnel so that student educational needs can remain the focus, while streamlining the process for families, who can expect timely assistance with sometimes complex registration forms.

Previously, students entering the district had to complete the registration process at the individual school the child would attend. But a desire to keep data current spurred the change to one location, Capone said.

Requirements have become increasingly more complex and requests for data are more frequent from both the state and federal levels, she added. Frequently, these requests are for immediate response and ask for large amounts of data.

Types of information requested may involve enrollment data or information related to demographics, program services, attendance, coursework, or teacher of record. Information collected at registration and reported to the state is tied to funding, school and district accountability and teacher and principal evaluations.