Niagara Gazette

Local News

November 7, 2012

Re-elected, Obama heads back to divided government

Re-elected, Obama heads back to divided government

Niagara Gazette — WASHINGTON — One day after his surprisingly comfortable re-election, a triumphant President Barack Obama headed back to the White House and divided government on Wednesday with little time left for a compromise with Republicans to avert spending cuts and tax increases that threaten a new recession.

The president also is looking ahead to top-level personnel changes in a second term, involving three powerful Cabinet portfolios at a minimum.

Republicans headed into a season of potentially painful reflection after retaining control of the House but losing the presidency and falling deeper into the Senate minority. One major topic: the changing face of America.

"We've got to deal with the issue of immigration through good policy. What is the right policy if we want economic growth in America as it relates to immigration?" said former Republican Party Chairman Haley Barbour. Obama drew support from about 70 percent of all Hispanics, far outpacing Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

There was little time to celebrate for the winners, with a postelection session of Congress scheduled to convene next Tuesday. By common agreement, the main order of business is the search for a compromise to keep the economy from falling off a so-called "fiscal cliff."

The White House said Obama had made postelection phone calls to congressional leaders and reiterated a commitment to bipartisan steps to "reduce our deficit in a balanced way, cut taxes for middle class families and small businesses and create jobs."

"The president said he believed that the American people sent a message in yesterday's election that leaders in both parties need to put aside their partisan interests and work with common purpose to put the interests of the American people and the American economy first," the statement said.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., told reporters that any solution should include higher taxes on "the richest of the rich." That was in keeping with Obama's election platform, which calls for the expiration of tax cuts on income over $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples.

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