Niagara Gazette

Local News

June 17, 2013

Lew-Port, Niagara-Wheatfield put up second school budgets for vote Tuesday

Niagara Gazette — Tuesday is decision day in two local school districts, as voting will determine the fates of operating budgets in Lewiston-Porter and Niagara-Wheatfield.

In Niagara-Wheatfield, a $62.4 million spending plan is proposed for 2013-14 which eliminates more than eight teaching positions and more than 10 support positions – including five in-class teacher aides – after a $62.8 million plan was defeated last month by three votes.

With its proposed 4.5 percent tax levy increase, the district is below its state property tax cap amount by 1.4 percent.

The district, which has hired Alden Superintendent Lynn Fusco to lead it next year, could be looking at cutting its kindergarten to half-day if a second vote also fails, a decision which could save the district $180,000 but create many more problems concerning providing education to its students.

Also a likely elimination should the voters again say no would be interscholastic sports, which come with a price tag of about $450,000 including varsity and junior varsity.

Part of a possible contingency budget, both programs could be eliminated because the district’s school board would need to make more than $1 million more in cuts above and beyond the eliminations found in the proposed spending plan.

Niagara-Wheatfield voters will be able to cast ballots between noon and 8 p.m. Tuesday in the Adult learning Center of the district’s high school, 2292 Saunders Settlement Road, Lewiston.

Lewiston-Porter is in a similar situation as Niagara-Wheatfield Tuesday, following a failed budget proposal in may which would have increased its tax levy, or total dollar amount collected in tax money, by 5.52 percent.

Learning from the mistake, the district returned its budget proposal below its tax cap levy figure to a 3.95 percent increase for the second vote.

Unlike many other districts, Lew-Port has decreased its spending from this year to what it has proposed in 2013-14, even before the first budget failed. Its $39.6 million plan eliminates several popular programs like many modified sports programs for middle school students, all transportation costs for field trips and an afterschool assistance program for struggling or underperforming high school students.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News
Featured Ads
Seasonal Content
House Ads
AP Video
Tributes Mark Boston Bombing Anniversary Raw: Kan. Shooting Suspect Faces Judge US Supports Ukraine's Efforts to Calm Tensions Suspect in Kansas Shootings Faces Murder Charges Ukraine: Military Recaptures Eastern Airport Raw: Storm Topples RVs Near Miss. Gulf Coast NASA Showcases Lunar Eclipse Pistorius Cries During Final Cross-Examination The Boston Marathon Bombing: One Year Later Michael Phelps Set to Come Out of Retirement First Women Move to Army Platoon Artillery Jobs Sex Offenders Charged in Serial Killings Police: Woman Stored Dead Babies in Garage OC Serial Murder Suspects May Have More Victims Family: 2 Shot in Head at Kan. Jewish Center Raw: Horse Jumping Inspires 'Bunny Hop' After Attack, Officials Kill 5 Bears in Florida Popular Science Honors Year's Top Inventions ND Oil Boom Attracting Drug Traffickers
Opinion
House Ads
Night & Day
Twitter News
Follow us on twitter
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Front page
Poll

Do you think cigarette sales to non-Native American customers should be taxed on reservations?

Yes. Items should be taxed like they are everywhere else.
No, the indian reservations are sovereign land and they are selling them on their land.
Not up to me. Native Americans decide the rules on their land.
Don't care. Smoking isn't good for you.
     View Results