Niagara Gazette

Local News

February 27, 2013

Report: Indian casinos revenue up slightly in 2011 -- except in New York

Niagara Gazette — HARTFORD, Conn. — Indian casinos brushed off weak consumer spending in a sluggish U.S. economic recovery to post a modest increase in revenue in 2011, an industry study reported Wednesday.

Except in New York, that is.

Gaming revenue growth at New York's eight Indian casinos fell nearly 3 percent between 2010 and 2011, the report from Casino City's Indian Gaming Industry Report found. That was the biggest drop off in the nation, according to the report from the Newtown, Mass-group.

Gaming revenue at Indian gaming facilities in New York decreased from $946 million to $921 million between 2010 and 2011, a 2.6 percent decline. The number of slot machines at the casinos fell nearly 2 percent, from 12,157 to 11,934, while the number of table games increased by nearly 5 percent, from 296 to 310.

Nationally, the revenue increase is the second in as many years following a first-ever drop in Indian casino revenue in 2009 as the worst recession in decades took its toll on consumer spending. The back-to-back increases in revenue are encouraging, the report said.

"The question is how much further can Indian gaming grow?" author Alan Meister said.

Indian gambling was slowing before the start of the recession in late 2007 due to legislation, regulations and court decisions that restricted the types of games offered by Indian casinos, the number of states where gambling is permitted and other limits, he said.

The outlook for Indian gambling now appears healthy because the economy is expected to continue improving, restoring consumer spending, Meister said. In addition, many tribes are upgrading, expanding and replacing casinos.

Indian-run casinos such as those in Alabama and Nebraska, he said, enjoy the advantage of being closer to consumers than many commercial casinos. "They're a good alternative to Vegas that's closer to home," he said.

But the long-term outlook for Indian gambling is uncertain, Meister said. Potential threats include continuing legal challenges — such as a land dispute court case in Michigan that Meister said increases the likelihood of other legal challenges to gambling projects — and state regulations that restrict Indian casinos and limit expansion. Indian casinos face "a lot more" restrictions than their commercial counterparts, he said.

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