Niagara Gazette

Local News

February 27, 2014

Plan seeks phosphorus cuts to stop Lake Erie algae

Niagara Gazette — TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Sharp cutbacks in phosphorus runoff into Lake Erie are needed to counter a worsening problem of algae blooms that degrade water quality, harm fish and chase away tourists, a U.S.-Canadian agency said in a report to both governments Thursday.

The International Joint Commission, which recommends policies dealing with the Great Lakes and other border waterways, recommended targets for lowering daily amounts of phosphorus flowing into the ailing Erie. It's the smallest of the five lakes yet has the most abundant fish population and supports a billion-dollar angling and boating industry.

The commission said the level must drop by 46 percent to shrink by half a "dead zone" where algae saps so much oxygen that fish can't survive. It called for a 39 percent decrease on the western side of the lake where algae blooms have been particularly widespread.

Phosphorus, a nutrient that feeds algae, was among pollutants that had so degraded Lake Erie by the 1970s that some declared it dead. The problem improved significantly with laws requiring steep reductions in phosphorus releases from wastewater treatment plants and factories. But it returned in the late 1990s and has steadily worsened. A bloom in summer of 2011 was the largest on record, coating a 1,930-square-mile surface area with greenish slime.

The algae is poisonous enough to kill animals and make people sick. An Ohio township last year ordered residents not to drink tap water for two days because of algae pollution, while Toledo and other cities have tested and treated their supplies. When the algae dies, foul rotting mats wash onto beaches or sink to the bottom, robbing the water — and fish — of oxygen.

The report largely blames the algae's resurgence on manure and chemical fertilizer from farms, along with urban sources such as lawn fertilizers, pet droppings, leaky septic tanks and storm water drains. It proposes designating the lake as an impaired waterway under the federal Clean Water Act to force phosphorus limits.

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