Niagara Gazette

Local News

March 20, 2013

Gillibrand urges federal minimum wage hike

Niagara Gazette — EDITOR’S NOTE: Niagara Gazette reporter Don Glynn participated in a conference call U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand held Tuesday with about 20 reporters across the state.

More than 140,000 Western New Yorkers could expect to benefit from a proposed increase in the federal minimum wage, U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, said Tuesday.

“It is simply unacceptable to have so many hard-woking New Yorkers putting in full-time hours for their families and yet still living below the poverty line,” Gillibrand said during the telephone conference call. “By raising the minimum wage and rewarding hard work, not only can more families raise themselves into the middle class, but we can grow the economy.”

Under the original plan co-sponsored by Gillibrand, the federal minimum wage would increase from $7.25 per hour to $10.10 over the next three years, with future increases indexed to the rate of inflation.

She told reporters that, if approved, the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013 would boost the incomes of an estimated 1.8 million New York workers, according to the Economic Policy Institute,, and generate some $3.2 billion in wage increases for the workers, revitalizing consumer spending at businesses in the Empire State. Some leading Republicans in the Senate and House take issue with Gillibrand’s projections on the bill.

The senator noted that a majority of the lowest wage earners in New York who would benefit from the increase are adult workers, not teenagers in after-school and seasonal jobs. In addition, 54 percent of the low-wage workers would be women, many with children, and about half are minorities.

It is estimated that a person now working full-time at minimum wage earns $290 per week, or $15,080 a year without any time off. That annual salary for a minimum-wage earning family of three is $3,000 below the poverty level on an annual basis. “That’s difficult to make ends meet and increases dependency on government assistance programs,” Gillibrand said.

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