Niagara Gazette

Editorials

January 31, 2014

CHEERS AND JEERS: The best -- and worst -- of the week for Jan. 31

Niagara Gazette — CHEERS: Niagara Falls police have another tool in the fight against prescription drug abuse. Sitting in the front lobby of the municipal complex is the city’s new pharmaceutical disposal unit, nicknamed the “Drug Dropbox.” It can be used for the disposal of controlled substances, out-dated medications, unwanted medications, over-the-counter medications or any other pharmaceutical item. It works about the same as your average mailbox – but it can be a big benefit to police. “(Prescription drug abuse) is one of our major concerns because it leads to harder drugs,” Falls police Superintendent Bryan DalPorto said. “The goal here is to provide an easy and safe way to dispose of medications so they don’t fall into the wrong hands or end up in the environment.”

 

CHEERS: A bit of good news came out of last week’s Niagara Falls school board meeting as it was reported that more than half of the subcontractors providing services on the district’s $67 million capital improvement project are located within a 20-mile radius of the city. District officials adopted a project labor agreement before starting the project in order to help the immediate area’s skilled, union laborers who might have lost out on the work. “It just goes to show we made the right decision. Everything seems to be working as intended to benefit the local economy,” said Johnny Destino, a board member who had pushed for officials to do everything possible to help Niagara County and Niagara Falls workers.

  

CHEERS: Members of the Niagara Falls City Council are venturing out into the community next month for a series of residential forums. The council will begin a series of “Neighbor to Neighbor” meetings next month with the first of the bi-monthly community forums to be held at the LaSalle branch of the Niagara Falls Public Library at 11 a.m. on Feb. 15. Council Chairman Charles Walker, who pushed to establish the series, said the meetings will help the council members keep their fingers on the pulse of residents’ concerns. The meetings also make it more convenient for local residents to get out and address concerns with their local lawmakers.

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