Niagara Gazette

January 29, 2014

Authorities take down cocaine trafficking, cockfighting rings in Niagara County

Authorities take down cocaine trafficking, cockfighting rings

By Rick Pfeiffer rick.pfeiffer@niagara-gazette.com
Niagara Gazette

Niagara Gazette — BUFFALO — For a ring of Niagara County drug dealers, it was all about the shoes.

Investigators with the New York State Attorney General’s Organized Crime Task Force and the New York State Police say the group trafficked cocaine from Florida to the Cataract City and moved their drugs by stashing them in the heels and soles of shoes that were shipped here by commercial carriers. 

At a Tuesday news conference in Buffalo, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman showed off a pair of shoes, with the heels sliced off and a secret compartment for drugs revealed, and said the ring of dealers ran a slick operation.

“It was a well-organized gang, it was a big gang,” he said. “These are people who sold narcotics to vulnerable New Yorkers.”

And the Niagara County gang was closely tied to a Genesee County group that dealt both cocaine and prescription drugs. A third drug ring in Erie County, that had contacts with the Niagara and Genesee county gangs, stands accused of selling cocaine, prescription medications and staging illegal cockfights on the Tuscarora Indian Reservation. 

A total of 40 people were charged in three separate indictments, with more than 160 combined counts, that were unsealed late Monday. By Tuesday afternoon, 35 of the 40 suspects had been picked up. 

Schneiderman and New York State Police Superintendent Joseph D’Amico said the parallel, 18-month-long investigations into the tri-county rings included undercover operations, GPS tracking and hundreds of hours of covert surveillance. 

Investigators seized more than $100,000 in cocaine, along with large quantities of prescription pills, several rifles and at least $60,000 in cash. Much of the evidence was laid out on a table next to the attorney general. 

“We took a hard shot at people who think they can flood our streets with dangerous drugs,” Schneiderman said. “Rings like these infect our neighborhoods and tear apart our communities.” 

Schneiderman said the probe, which also included Niagara Falls and Buffalo police investigators, was a “seamless operation with our partners in law enforcement.”

“One of the greatest experiences I’ve had (as attorney general) is the seamless work with our colleagues in law enforcement,” Schneiderman said. 

The Niagara and Genesee County rings were targeted in an probe code-named Operation Lockport.

Members of those drug rings transported cocaine from Fort Lauderdale to the Falls. The suspects would pack cocaine into the soles and heels of doctored pairs of shoes, then cut up the shoes once in they arrived here to extract the drugs. 

The shoes, along with box cutters, razor blades and utility knives, were found in a vehicle belonging to Vincent Mundy, of Fort Lauderdale, who was arrested on Tuesday morning.

The cocaine was then sold to Falls dealers Jermaine Cox and Lamar Johnson and Genesee County ringleader Geraldine Horsefall. Investigators said Horsefall was assisted in the drug sales by her adult children. 

Schneiderman said Horsefall also would bring her grandchildren with her when she was dealing drugs.

The Erie County-based investigation, code-named Operation TGIF for one of the suspects who worked at the poplar downtown restaurant, led to the recovered nearly 700 grams of cocaine. Investigators said the suspects in that case arranged to have cocaine transported to Buffalo from New York City and Boston.

During the course of Operation TGIF, investigators discovered that members of the drug network attended regular cockfights on the Tuscarora Indian Reservation. Undercover investigators observed hundreds of cockfights, including many at which the animals were killed.

In some of the fights, spurs and razor blades were attached to the birds’ legs. Bets were placed on each fight, an admission fee was collected and a referee was paid to oversee the fights. 

Falls Mayor Paul Dyster expressed his thanks to Schneiderman and D’Amico for “working to keep (city) neighborhoods safe.” 

“A lot of what we do is at the retail level of fighting crime, in the neighborhoods,” Dyster said. “But you do need to attack this at the wholesale level too. We can’t do that alone. Today, we’re witnessing the results of different law enforcement agencies coming together and sending a message that narcotics have no place in our community.”